T O P

HELP! it's my first sock and i'm knitting with circular needles, not sure why u can see the 'separation' where the stitches are divided on my needles :(

HELP! it's my first sock and i'm knitting with circular needles, not sure why u can see the 'separation' where the stitches are divided on my needles :(

DarrenFromFinance

It's extremely common to have at least a little bit of a ladder between needles. If you absolutely hate them and can handle the confusion, one way to eliminate them completely is to work the first stitch from the next needle onto the current needle: in other words, if you have 16 stitches on each needle, you work 17 stitches on the first needle and then 16 on each subsequent needle so that the joins between the needles are constantly shifting. This would drive me crazy and I've never even tried it but some people do it. A better way, which is excellent but not perfect and can leave a very minor ladder, is to do this: on each needle, work the first stitch as you normally would, insert the needle for the second stitch, and then pull the yarn *very* snugly before wrapping the stitch and pulling it through. If you try to tighten the first stitch, it will never work, because it will loosen before you can complete the second stitch: but if you tighten the second stitch, it will actually tighten the first stitch and your ladders will be minimized. This is how I do it, and it works for me: the ladders are always minimal, and sometimes they're invisible.


saigeblob

thanks!!! i was thinking about doing that shifting solution and didn't know that people actually do that! but yeah it might drive me crazy too haha but i'll def try the other way next time! thanks!


kellinmyfeels

It’s from laddering between needles due to tension, snug up on the first few stitches when changing needles (don’t choke the stitches!) as well as holding the other cable or needle close to the stitch to not stretch the stitches too much when changing and it should go away with future socks. You can try blocking for this one or pulling the legs of the neighbouring stitches to distribute the extra yarn better but it might not work the best


saigeblob

thank u for this!!! will do that for my next sock and will block these current ones!!


Adventurous-Garden69

I literally just logged on to ask the same question for my very first sock! [my first sock](https://imgur.com/gallery/7NSc0rc) I’m using malabrigo rios and the “easy peasy socks” by Stacey Trock pattern. I’m only getting this on the left side of my decreases along the gusset, where I was doing ssk decreases and not on the right where I was doing k2tog. But I have them on both sides of my toe decreases. Hopefully someone has great advice that’ll help us with the second one. In the mean time, you’re not the only one who is feeling a mix of accomplishment and bummed out!


[deleted]

It's called a ladder. If you Google that term you can find a lot of ways to help remedy it. It's a tension issue and depends on the person as to exactly what is causing it. Can mean you're pulling your yarn too tight when you move your needles or too loose. Remember some of it will even out when you wash or block the socks.


saigeblob

thanks!


Nithuir

It's worth mentioning that twisted stitches can also cause ladders to be more visible as the stitches pull into themselves rather than apart when stretched. But the other responses have some good tips to reduce laddering as well.


reformedhelpeveryone

You can still fix it, by pulling on the stitches near it. There’s a very pink knits video on how to fix it. Snagged stitches is what she calls it I think


saigeblob

thanks! gon check it out!!


saigeblob

btw the sock fits just nice -not too loose or too tight


lollyf93

This happens to me when I do magic loop the normal way, so I now do it as per the link below and have never had any issues like this since https://youtu.be/DdXbUiF9tyA


campbowie

Is it possible to use this technique with two at a time socks?


lollyf93

I haven't attempted two at a time either way so I couldn't say for certain but with my (limited) understanding of how you would do it, I don't think this would work for it


craigles

As others have mentioned, laddering is a fairly common speedbump we've all run into at some point. I've been knitting for a while now and still haven't mastered avoiding it entirely using magic loop; I'm a DPN fan in this regard. Avoid having all the stitches free on the cable rather than on the needles; instead of immediately pulling the full needle out of the stitches and then sliding the fresh needle into place, pull the fresh needle into the second side so both needles are side by side and loaded up with stitches. Then pull out the needed needle. With both needles loaded up side by side, a telltale sign that a ladder is forming is if the needles flop apart, as this means there's excess yarn between the needles; not looking for them to be so tight they seem to be glued together, but you also don't want the needles to fall away from one another either; aim for tension just tight enough that the stitches on both needles touch. When caught early, you can use a spare needle to adjust excess yarn backward along a needle toward the middle so it blends in a bit better, and then tighten up your tension a bit at the start of each row; 2-3 *slightly* tighter stitches at the beginning of each needle should do it. Alternatively, the option I best prefer for socks to avoid the risk of ladders all together is to use 9-inch circular needles. They're not always easy to find, and there's a bit of a learning curve to them as the needles themselves are only about 1.5-2 inches long on either end, but the small circumference allows you knit nonstop without having to switch needles or worry about ladders.


saigeblob

is there a name for the technique you mentioned for using a spare needle to adjust the tension? not really sure how it works so i thought i can find a video on it or something heh. and yeah, am thinking about trying out 9 inch needles, they sound a bit finicky but it'll be great to pick up a new way of knitting socks!


craigles

I'm sure someone's come up with a name for the technique, but I'm not familiar with one. I just searched YouTube for "Knitting fix loose stitches" and found this video from VeryPink Knits: [https://youtu.be/eRzuwimh9tw](https://youtu.be/eRzuwimh9tw). She demonstrates on a finished piece, but it's the exact same process if you're currently knitting; moving back along a row, gently tug on the legs of the stitches to disperse the excess yarn among the rest of the work.


saigeblob

oooo thank u!!