T O P

hello i need help!! im super new to taking care of plants in general and i just got my monstera like this, should i repot it? and i know they're climbers so is binding them up like this bad for them? should i get a moss pole? and if so do i need to repot it too?

hello i need help!! im super new to taking care of plants in general and i just got my monstera like this, should i repot it? and i know they're climbers so is binding them up like this bad for them? should i get a moss pole? and if so do i need to repot it too?

hotwheels430

Those are tip cuttings. Lucky you, you didn’t have to get a small plant to get a big one. I would put in Moss pole ASAP and I would not repot it just yet. Wait until spring. Keep it on the dry side over winter.


saigeblob

i live in singapore! we basically dont have seasons here actually! and about the moss pole, i can just stick it into the soil without repotting it?


am_i_plant

You can put moss poll, but before it see some videos how not to damage roots while doing so. These baby cuttings will likely have week roots.


saigeblob

alrighty! i'll get on with the youtube videos!! thank you!!


arexisreee

Hi there, this is a beautiful buy!! I‘m from Singapore too and I got a monstera about 6 weeks ago. I made the mistake of overwatering it - by watering it every 4-5 days. Some of the leaves started to have brown spots with yellow edges, a few other leaves turned yellow. I haven’t watered it in more than 2 weeks since. I’m thinking of repotting mine but I’m leaving it for longer to see if it gets better. Just want to give you a heads up on how easy it is to overwater this guy. Too much TLC can be a problem with plants. Have fun!


saigeblob

thank you!!! i feel in love with him the moment i saw him ehehe thanks for the heads-up!! sorry to hear about your experience :( i got mine from a neighbourhood store and the guy told me to water him about 4 days a week and i took that advice and watered him the second he's in my home! i'm going to be leaving him alone for a bit to recover. good luck with yours!!!


THEdopealope

That's a good looking plant! Just an FYI: the yellowing makes me think it may be a little overwatered. You can definitely go ahead and unbind it, it probably isn't bad for them, per se, but it certainly isn't natural. While you may not need to repot it before putting a moss pole in, but it doesn't hurt either. If you live in a year-round grow season, I'd just wait a bit to see how the plant grows. Then you can give it a pole wherever it appears that plant wants one. Look for aerial roots - you want to encourage those to dig into the moss pole. With the premade moss poles I've used, I would soak them in filtered water with a little bit of fertilizer. I found that the roots would take hold pretty fast. But like I said - there's no rush, especially if the plant just moved into a new home and is dealing with overwatering. Get it healthy first, then start messing with it (for it's own good lol). ​ Congrats!


saigeblob

thank you!! the leaves were already yellow when i got em so i'm holding back on the watering for now! thank u for the advice gosh i'm gonna just observe how he does in my home for a few weeks maybe before repotting it then!! thank u!!


saigeblob

also how can i tell where the plant appears to want a moss pole? :0


THEdopealope

Another tip, and I guess good practice if you're going to put in a moss pole without repotting, I've had success remedying the adverse effects of overwatering through careful aeration of the soil using a long stick (I used a long s'more stick lol). Basically, one of the problems due to overwatering is that it lets bacteria thrive to a point where they start outcompeting the plant's roots for oxygen. Roots get weaker, bacteria is able to overcome them, bing bang boom - root rot. So I take a long stick and slowly poke a hole starting from the perimeter of the pot, down towards the center. I say it's good practice because you have to "feel" for major roots. AKA if something stops you from moving forward, stop, wiggle around, and see if you can "push" it aside. The plant won't "want" a pole in a particular area, but since you have multiple cuttings, one of them may start putting out aerial roots before the others. I'd say you should place the pole near that part of the plant, so those root can grab on and start climbing!


saigeblob

so if i can't 'push' it aside, that's probably the area for the pole placement? so sorry for all these questions i'm just super new to this aaaaa this has been so far REALLY useful advice


THEdopealope

Haha no worries - happy to help! If you can’t push it aside, that means you may be poking at a major root. Obviously, you don’t want to damage that so it’s best to leave it be and start another aeration hole. The holes don’t have to reach the base of the pot, although that can be helpful if drainage is the problem. Their main purpose is to introduce a fresh supply of O2. The soil will fill’m back up over time, at which point you hopefully won’t need them anymore. The possibility of a major root being there also means that you probably don’t want to place a pole there. But it doesn’t necessarily mean that. While that may sound confusing, just remember that the pole is for aerial roots, not subsoil ones. Aerial ones pop out at the base of new growth above the soil. Think of them as tentacles that will help the plant crawl it’s way up a pole. Accordingly, pole placement should be based on how stability, as that directly correlates with its capacity to support new growth and the weight of the plant). Deeper = more stability, so base vertical placement on that, and base location on where aerial roots are/which part of the plant is developing faster & looking for a grip. Keep in mind that you also don’t want the pole to be too short (buried too deeply) because the plant will want to keep climbing and you want to give it as much pole as possible! Also, aeration holes should be much more narrow than the hole for the moss pole. If the holes are too wide, you may end up compressing the soil around the holes, which can also be problematic. But you aren’t likely to have that problem since it looks like you have plenty of space in your pot above the soil level. So if you’re worried the soil is compressed (which is just generally unlikely unless you’re poking two dozen holes, and you’ll probably be fine with like, four, tops) you can try to redistribute the density of the soil vertically (as opposed to horizontally via compression due to the holes). Does that make sense? It’s kinda hard for me to explain. Just try to picture it. If the yellowing gets worse, carefully pull off afflicted leaves. That way the plant won’t continue to wast energy on lost causes. Instead, it can focus on fighting infection and more importantly, on root growth. Root growth helps fight over-watering cos there are simply more roots absorbing more water - more straws in the cup. Although I would be very surprised for it to become necessary in your case (since it doesn’t look like an advanced stage of root rot) - the final resort to saving a plant is uprooting it, cutting off dead/decaying roots, and replanting in fresh soil. One more thing I forgot to mention earlier that may be helpful in your case: make sure the drainage holes at the bottom of the pot are actually draining. Take a pencil and poke around (carefully - no more than ~5 cm). Note - I’m telling you this just for your personal knowledge since you mentioned you’re new to owning plants. You likely won’t need to do this, and certainly try to avoid it! Think of most of the things I’ve mentioned as emergency management. The best thing for plants is to let them do their own thing. If you get too involved, it can stress the plant out. That’s also why I suggested letting it sit for a bit before repotting. Right now the plant needs to manage it’s condition + adjust to the new environment. So just give it good light (bright indirect), and water sparingly and precisely. I say precisely because while you don’t want to exacerbate problems due to overwatering, you also don’t want to subject the plant to extremes. Monsteras like consistency. It helps to think of their natural environment - that’s what you’re trying to replicate. But again, you don’t want to exacerbate the situation, so just pour a little bit of filtered water in the center of the pot once the top ~5cm of soil are dry (not bone-dry, just dry).


saigeblob

ah i was wondering about the draining thing! thanks for the tip! i poked the holes around with a chopstick and no water dribbled out but i could definitely see that the soil is wet. is that okay? i havent seen any actual draining happening since i got it (like 3 days ago).. i know for a fact that he's getting too much water because i've been seeing little water droplets on his leaves and after some research i realised that it was a natural thing called guttation also! im pretty sure i sure the aerial roots dipping in and out of the soil. are those the stuff im supposed to eventually 'train' on the moss pole? for now i'm still not sure if i should even unbind them because if i don't, then i know that some of them would dip so low and hurt their stems. should i just let it happen? or just wait until i get a moss pole and everything


THEdopealope

Those probably aren't [aerial roots](https://3.bp.blogspot.com/-gZCE7s1GTnQ/XHvnX8IuR0I/AAAAAAABy4U/L60SXl4oMU0cLf73hLn8WCzOW5ZkUeMLwCLcBGAs/s1600/IMG_5197.jpg), and I don't see any in the photo you posted. In any case, I wouldn't mess with those roots that are already "rooted". Also, the soil isn't going to drain in that way right now, you're just helping it evaporate excess water. Dribbling out (i.e. drainage) happens when you're actually watering the plant. As to un/binding, I would do it just because I'd want the leaves more spread out, but it's really up to you. It probably won't make a substantial difference at this point since it's already rooted. Good luck!


saigeblob

thank you so much!!! aaa hope im able to lead this monstera towards a really good life!!


THEdopealope

Haha no worries - I'm sure it'll be fine! Good luck


THEdopealope

I should also mention that my way of handling isn’t the “normal” way. Generally, checking roots, repotting, and letting things thoroughly dry out is the typical recommended remedy to root rot. I think it’s appropriate for advanced stages, and a lot of the time people only start to take action once things have progressed to that point. You’re far from there imo. I consider advanced stages to be entirely or mostly yellow leaves that have started to develop black stains. You just have some yellowing at the tips of just some leaves, which is just the plant saying it’s too much to drink - not drowning yet though. Plants will also do a thing where they expel excess water through their leaves. This is called guttation and just looks like little droplets, usually at the tip. So that’s the very first sign of overwatering. If you miss it, you may start to notice yellowing, as is the case with your guy. But you only have slight yellowing. Although it’s a sign of overwatering, imo, guttation is also a sign of a healthy plant because it’s still able to handle it’s own problems.


saigeblob

oh no some of the leaves have little tiny brown dots :( is that a sign that it's gonna be developing into black patches


THEdopealope

I wouldn't know unless I saw it, but it's unlikely. But if they get bigger and are mushy, then yes. Your plant doesn't look like it's in that dire a state. If they look "woody", that's totally fine and nothing to worry about. If they're realllly tiny and look like waxy little things - they might be scale bugs. But that's also unlikely.


saigeblob

will keep an eye on them then!! thanks SO MUCH


THEdopealope

no worries!


THEdopealope

[You can read more about root rot here](https://www.pennington.com/all-products/fertilizer/resources/recovering-from-root-rot) You can read about installing a trellis for your monstera [here](https://www.houseplantjournal.com/home/monstera-trellis) and you can read more about moss poles [here](https://www.gardeningknowhow.com/houseplants/swiss-cheese-plant/moss-pole-plant-support.htm). [This article](https://www.ourhouseplants.com/plants/monstera-deliciosa) provides a good general overview about M. Deliciosa, although I strongly disagree with the author’s opinion on variegation lol


saigeblob

thank you!! i'll definitely read up!!