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WingerSupreme

There is one huge limitation with the study that people are missing. It only looks at cases that need hospitalization, and threshold people have for going to the hospital increased significantly during the pandemic, especially when COVID has been at its worst. This is anecdotal, but I know a couple staff members on the mental health floor of our hospital, and I asked one of them about this a few months ago. She said overall admissions for youth were down, but those who were admitted were, on average, worse off than pre-Pandemic. This isn't just a mental health phenomenon, either, and I experienced it myself. I felt something pop in my neck but didn't get it checked out until I literally couldn't work because my eyes were blurry and my head was pounding, it just wasn't worth a 3-hour wait in the ER surrounded by people who are coughing or otherwise unwell.


AhmedF

> **Findings** In this cohort study of 1 690 733 adolescents and young adults in all of Ontario, the rate of self-harm or overdose was lower during (39.7 per 10 000 person-years) than before (51.0 per 10 000 person-years) the pandemic. > > **Meaning** At least up to mid-2021, the COVID-19 pandemic has not been associated with an excess of self-harm requiring health care among adolescents and young adults.


adotmatrix

From the study in this post: **Limitations:** This study has limitations. Because our data did not capture self-harm or overdose events without a hospital or ED encounter, less life-threatening cases may have been missed. One analysis was confined to self-harm and overdose cases requiring hospital admission, which was less frequent during than before the pandemic. We lacked details about completed suicides occurring out-of-hospital, but we captured all-cause death, which was relatively uncommon. For example, during the pandemic, there were 3.9 deaths per 10 000 person-years compared with 28.1 self-harm events per 10 000 person-years. Mortality did not change from before to during the pandemic, because most self-harm events among adolescents and young adults tend to be nonfatal,20 while the case-fatality rate from COVID-19 in this age group has been very low.21 The overall large number of cases recorded within a universal health care system enabled us to generate stable and precise risk estimates, including by sociodemographic factors related to intentional injury or mortality. The limitations of this study need to be considered. It is not an overall picture of adolescent and youth mental health. It also does not factor in eating disorders which have the highest mortality rate of all psychiatric diseases and have been increasing throughout the pandemic. for example: [https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2786919](https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamanetworkopen/fullarticle/2786919) "Hospitalizations for new patients also increased sharply with the COVID-19 pandemic, increasing from 7.5 cases per month to 20 cases per month, on average. It is just a glimpse of one set of data, albeit positive and I certainly won't detract from that.


beejmusic

Yes, but they're not comparing pre-covid with eating disorders vs post-covid without. The study illustrates the apparent effect the pandemic may have had on this one aspect of youth mental health and found the pandemic may have had a positive effect.


adotmatrix

Can you clarify what you mean by "found it to be helpful"


Deguilded

fewer or the same number of adolescents and young adults harmed themselves. I mean... it's right there: > **Meaning** At least up to mid-2021, the COVID-19 pandemic has not been associated with an excess of self-harm requiring health care among adolescents and young adults.


beejmusic

The study found a decrease in self-harm during the pandemic.


Deguilded

It's fascinating that the levels went down.. except when school was reopening and the pandemic spreading. Literally the opposite finding to the "common knowledge".


beejmusic

It's common knowledge that when I was being ritually bullied at high school snow days were such a relief I'd cry a bit. A pandemic would have been an answer to my prayers.


iambluest

The "kids suffer in every way imaginable if schools close" narrative is being pushed, and there is little mystery into* who is pushing it.


JenningsWigService

Some kids benefit from being kept at home, because school is unsafe and home is safe, and other kids suffer because home isn't safe at all.


iambluest

This is the understanding that politicians should be pursuing. Not pushing anecdotal reports to back their demand schools remain open.


beejmusic

I edited for clarity


adotmatrix

Thanks. I was a bit confused by the original wording.


robert9472

Students (especially low income students) are falling behind in their education https://news.yahoo.com/school-data-2021-math-reading-121500474.html. > Despite promises to focus on the growing racial and income divide among the nation’s students, new fall testing data show academic gaps have worsened, falling heaviest on some of the most vulnerable children. > While education researchers have sounded the alarm for more than a year — that pandemic learning hurts low-income students and students of color most severely — recent scores suggest education solutions cannot come fast enough. > “More students are two or more grade levels below their actual grade level this fall than before the pandemic began,” according to Curriculum Associates’ November “Understanding Student Learning” report, which analyzed 3 million students’ fall 2021 i-Ready scores against averages from 2017-19. > “This means that teachers will not only have fewer students beginning the school year on grade level, but they will also have more students in need of intensive intervention and support.” Overdoses and alcohol related deaths are up: https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/overdoses-alcohol-related-deaths-increased-in-canadians-under-65-during-pandemic-statcan-1.5506375 Canadian adults under the age of 54 have consumed more alcohol since the start of the COVID-19 outbreak, a new poll has found: https://www.ctvnews.ca/health/coronavirus/canadians-under-54-drinking-more-at-home-due-to-covid-19-pandemic-nanos-poll-1.4897031 Researchers at the University of Calgary have found that liver disease-related hospitalization rates in Alberta nearly doubled during the COVID-19 pandemic as Albertans consume more booze: https://calgary.ctvnews.ca/alberta-experiencing-pandemic-spikes-in-excessive-drinking-patients-with-liver-damage-1.5562309


nullstate7

"Among adolescents and young adults, a 15-month period of the COVID-19 pandemic was associated with a relative decline in self-harm or overdose. " It does not, nor can it speak to the the Self-harm & over dose that may come as as result of the monitored 15 month period over the next 24 months (mid 2021 on wards).


True_Article

Would be interested to read how adults fared (considering mostly we don’t have our parents in the next room)